paranormal-peggy

redbrunja:

redbrunja:

  

         

charliebartowskis
charliebartowskis:

"I was reading a book of poetry one day [on set of Captain America] when Tommy [Lee Jones] came over and sat beside me and said, “I’m really pleased to see you’re reading poetry.” Then to encourage me he began reciting a Seamus Heaney poem about sailors by heart. “Wow,” I was thinking, “Here’s the star of ‘Men in Black’ reciting an old Irish poet to me in a field at Shepperton.” It was a moment I will never forget.”

charliebartowskis:

"I was reading a book of poetry one day [on set of Captain America] when Tommy [Lee Jones] came over and sat beside me and said, “I’m really pleased to see you’re reading poetry.” Then to encourage me he began reciting a Seamus Heaney poem about sailors by heart. “Wow,” I was thinking, “Here’s the star of ‘Men in Black’ reciting an old Irish poet to me in a field at Shepperton.” It was a moment I will never forget.”

oupacademic
Coriolanus is caught between imploration to demonstrate his greatness as a soldier and his natural inclination to keep the consequences of such prowess private. It is the play’s great irony that the character at the heart of the narrative and who, according to theatrical convention can thus be expected to perform the greatest amount of speeches, is reluctant to the point of discourtesy.

Anna Blackwell, “Adapting Coriolanus: Tom Hiddleston’s Body and Action Cinema,” from Adaptation.

Anna Blackwell was recently named the recipient of Adaptation's 2014 Essay Prize. Read her paper free for a limited time.

(via oupacademic)